Canada
COUNTRIES GRAPPLE WITH SURGE IN PLASTIC WASTE POLLUTION DUE TO COVID-19
06/01/2020
Update Volume
50
Update Issue
16

The coronavirus pandemic has dramatically increased reliance on single-use plastics, resulting in a plastics pollution crisis faced by many countries around the world. A French environmental nongovernmental organization recently released a video showing masks and gloves littering the seabed of the Mediterranean Sea.

CANADA BANS SHARK FIN TRADING
06/24/2019
Update Volume
49
Update Issue
18

On June 18, Canada passed a new law banning the import and export of shark fins. Called the Fisheries Act, the new law also requires depleted fish populations to be rebuilt. Canada, which is the largest importer of shark fins outside of Asia, is the first G20 country to ban the export and import of shark fins. For the full story, see https://uk.reuters.com/article/us-canada-fisheries/canada-becomes-first….

CANADIAN CRUDE OIL PRODUCER FINED FOR BLUE HERON DEATHS
01/07/2019
Update Volume
49
Update Issue
1

Canada's Syncrude has pleaded guilty to the deaths of 31 blue herons at its oil sands mine in northern Alberta and fined C$2.75 million. According to Alberta's energy regulator, the birds died after becoming oiled in an abandoned sump that was built to collect process-affected water containing residual bitumen from a storage site at the mine. Syncrude was previously fined C$3 million for negligence in the 2008 deaths of 1,600 ducks in a toxic tailings pond.

CANADA IMPOSES CARBON TAX ON FOUR PROVINCES
10/29/2018
Update Volume
48
Update Issue
30

On October 23, Canada's Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, announced a plan to tax industrial emitters and fuels in Ontario, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and New Brunswick. The fuel surcharge is expected to raise about 2.3 billion Canadian dollars in revenue next year, much of which will be sent out as benefits to individuals. The tax on large industrial emitters will begin in January, and the fuel tax will take effect in April. For the full story, see https://www.eenews.net/climatewire/2018/10/25/stories/1060104259.

CANADA ASKS SHIPS TO REDUCE SPEEDS TO PREVENT WHALE DEATHS
08/14/2017
Update Volume
47
Update Issue
23

After 10 North Atlantic right whales were killed in Canada's Gulf of St. Lawrence over the past two months, the Canadian government is ordering certain ships to reduce speeds to prevent more deaths. 2017 has been the deadliest year for the endangered mammal since scientists began tracking their numbers in the 1980's. Vessels that are 20 meters or longer are temporarily restricted to a maximum speed of 10 knots in the western portion of the Gulf. For the full story see http://uk.reuters.com/article/us-canada-whales-idUKKBN1AR20O. 

CANADA TO IMPOSE FUEL TAX ON PROVINCES
05/22/2017
Update Volume
47
Update Issue
15

Canada announced that it planned to impose a cap on pollution in provinces that refuse to adopt a national price on carbon. Last December, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau reached a deal with 8 of the 10 provinces to introduce a carbon price to curb emissions of greenhouse gases, and threatened to impose it on holdout provinces. Thursday, the government proposed a tax on fossil fuels that would increase annually. Under Trudeau's plan, carbon pollution would cost $10 a ton in 2018, rising by $10 a year until it reaches $50 in 2022.

CANADA AND AUSTRALIA DIVERGE ON CARBON PRICING
12/12/2016
Update Volume
46
Update Issue
35

As countries around the world begin to implement their nationally determined contributions under the Paris Agreement, there is a demonstrable rift between liberal and conservative governments. As of Friday, Canada’s government, led by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and 10 provinces were set to agree on a national price for carbon. The plan allows provinces to implement either a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade market; those provinces not willing to choose will have a carbon tax imposed by the national government.

PIPELINE EXPANSION A CONTESTED ISSUE FOR INDIGENOUS GROUPS IN CANADA
08/29/2016
Update Volume
46
Update Issue
24

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will have to decide on the $5.4 billion Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, balancing the demands of Native American groups and the need for growth. Whispering Pines Indian Band is in favor of the expansion, as they will receive economic support from the company following years of negotiations. But located closer to the pipeline’s end is, the Tsleil-Waututh First Nation is against the expansion, contending that it will lead to oil spills on their land and into Canada’s waters.